The Key Trilogy

Nora Roberts generally has a sort of pattern to her trilogies. The first woman is fighting for her self-respect, the second generally has some sort of specialization to round her out, like knowledge or fitness or a business, and the third is courageous and stubborn, fighting against all the odds.

The Key Trilogy is one of my favorites of the Nora Roberts trilogies, competing for first place with The Three Sisters Island Trilogy. In these three books, resourceful Malory, Dana, and Zoe have to work to find three mythical keys that will unlock a box of souls to save three trapped demigoddesses. Their mystical quest is mirrored by one in the physical world, as they work together to open a combined bookstore/cafe/art gallery/salon. They conveniently all fall in love with wealthy men, who have been friends since childhood.

When I first started grad school, I was embarrassed to say that I read Nora Roberts. Her plots are formulaic, predictable, and she uses more adverbs and flowery prose than I’d like. And yet—there’s something there, in these books. A heart, a soulful center that exhibits the author’s deep-held belief that women are badass, that they will triumph. Sure, it’s steeped in love stories, in always finding a man and marriage at the end of the line. And that doesn’t ring very authentic for the world we live in today. There’s also never any gay relationships, which is frankly disappointing.

There’s a comfort in knowing what is to come, though. These books are steady, reliable. They aren’t the worst thing for a young girl to read, even if they aren’t the best, either. As an adult, I enjoy the steamy sex scenes, the fast pace of the effective, if flowery, prose. There’s emotion in it, and plenty of strength and steel in the women to relate or aspire to. And aside from most other adult fiction, romance novels often have a pleasing emphasis on love, or should I say, a distinct lack of emphasis on the practical side of things, like money, sickness, age, etc.

It’s funny that the women tend to be in their sensible late twenties when they’re finally finding the right men in these books, and interesting to see how Nora Roberts’ writing evolves from her early books to these. I think the Key Trilogy comes from what I like to view as her magical milieu of trilogies and stand-alones. Before that were the Ireland stories, and after came the romance novels with clear horror elements that got too difficult for me to read, sometimes.

I’ve read this trilogy a few times, and sought it out recently when I no longer had copies of my own because they it is a comforting, “guilty pleasure” read that restores my faith in interesting stories after tiring slogs like A Song of Ice and Fire. Romance novels and Young Adult novels can always be counted on for that sort of thing.

I suppose I would recommend this trilogy mostly to Nora Roberts fans. If you haven’t read a romance novel, these are as good a place to start as any, and if you like adding a bit of magic to our mundane world, you’ll like the way that Roberts weaves in mythology and the fantastic to her tales. They’re not classics, to be sure, but I’m definitely glad to have read them as a kid, and to be able to read them again now.

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